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BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER.... A's, G's & E's


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Twinpilot001
dix
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    Dielectric grease

    dix
    dix
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    Post by dix Thu Mar 13, 2014 2:45 pm

    this should be interesting to hear from people about this,

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-542IYGBbpg
    Twinpilot001
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    Post by Twinpilot001 Thu Mar 13, 2014 4:34 pm

    I agree!!!!!!!!!!!!!! cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers 
    Digz
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    Post by Digz Thu Mar 13, 2014 6:18 pm

    I've only ever used it to lube the boots on the wire when building them from scratch. never on the plug itself.
    jrinaman
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    Post by jrinaman Thu Mar 13, 2014 7:12 pm

    so why does it need to be dielectric?
    Twinpilot001
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    Post by Twinpilot001 Thu Mar 13, 2014 7:18 pm

    dieelectric-will NOT conduct =ELECTRICITY!! Other greases -WILL affraid 
    dix
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    Post by dix Thu Mar 13, 2014 7:40 pm

    Ok so my question is on some electrical items for automotive what is the intenions when the grease is already in the female side of the plug ???


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    jrinaman
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    Post by jrinaman Thu Mar 13, 2014 8:01 pm

    did some research. dielectric means nonconductive. however, there are greases that resist corrosion and DO conduct. I always thought that was dielectric and even saw ads for it being called dielectric grease. I have a tube of 'ox-gard' that I use for that purpose and always thought it was dielectric. sure would suck to use the wrong one!
    dix
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    Post by dix Fri Mar 14, 2014 1:16 pm

    Ok i know i bought electricial parts from the auto pats store that has what looked to be dielectic grease in the female side of the plug, from the manufactor SO what is in the plug . ???


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    Post by Twinpilot001 Fri Mar 14, 2014 1:37 pm

    die electric grease-from the mfg!
    m1dadio
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    Post by m1dadio Fri Mar 14, 2014 4:22 pm

    Don't completely agree

    The electrical current is only going to flow through the connecter only where the metal terminals are touching each other. The dielectric grease is not going to prevent the metal to metal contact in a tight fitting terminal connection. The dielectric grease is going to weather seal all the  rest of the contacts inside the connection to prevent water ingestion and other atmospheric contaminants. And it makes the connections come apart easier when you need to do service.
    Proper dielectric grease like Dow Corning #4 (DC4) is also thermal conductive so it doesn't cause heat build up in electrical connections, it in fact transfers the heat away to the outer casing.

    Some greases are actually made to conduct electricity and improve conductivity and allow heat transfer. An example is the compound used when connecting aluminum wiring.

    I use that dielectric grease on all my vehicle electrical connections because the corrosion issues associated with not using it is much worse then any issue when using it.

    That is what I put on all the light bulbs before I put them in the socket and use to lubricate the springs in the sockets so they push the contact plate against the bulb bottom with a good force.

    Yes it does come already in the connections of many new and re manufactured electric components for those same reasons.

    The dielectric grease used on the bottom of the GM HEI distributor module is used solely for its thermal transference properties to make the distributor base be a heat sink.

    M1D
    Mr Hill Billy
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    Post by Mr Hill Billy Mon May 26, 2014 4:47 pm

    Dielectric grease[edit]

    Dielectric grease is electrically insulating and does not break down when high voltage is applied. It is often applied to electrical connectors, particularly those containing rubber gaskets, as a means of lubricating and sealing rubber portions of the connector without arcing.

    A common use of dielectric grease is in high-voltage connections associated with gasoline engine spark plugs. The grease is applied to the rubber boot of the plug wire. This helps the rubber boot slide onto the ceramic insulator of the plug. The grease also acts to seal the rubber boot, while at the same time preventing the rubber from becoming stuck to the ceramic. Generally spark plugs are located in areas of high temperature, and the grease is formulated to withstand the temperature range expected. It can be applied to the actual contact as well, because the contact pressure is sufficient to penetrate the grease. Doing so on such high pressure contact surfaces between different metals has the advantage of sealing the contact area against electrolytes that might cause rapid galvanic corrosion.

    Another common use of dielectric grease is on the rubber mating surfaces or gaskets of multi-pin electrical connectors used in automotive and marine engines. The grease again acts as a lubricant and a sealant on the nonconductive mating surfaces of the connector. It is not recommended to be applied to the actual electrical conductive contacts of the connector because it could interfere with the electrical signals passing through the connector in cases where the contact pressure is very low. Products designed as electronic connector lubricants, on the other hand, should be applied to such connector contacts and can dramatically extend their useful life. Polyphenyl Ether, rather than silicone grease, is the active ingredient in some such connector lubricants.

    Silicone grease should not be applied to (or next to) any switch contact that might experience arcing, as silicone can convert to silicon-carbide under arcing conditions, and accumulation of the silicon-carbide can cause the contacts to prematurely fail. (British Telecom had this problem in the 1970s when silicone Symel® sleeving was used in telephone exchanges. Vapour from the sleeving migrated to relay contacts and the resultant silicon-carbide caused intermittent connection.)


    THERMAL GREASE

    Thermal grease (also called thermal gel, thermal compound, thermal paste, heat paste, heat sink paste, thermal interface material, or heat sink compound) is a viscous fluid substance, originally with properties akin to grease, which increases the thermal conductivity of a thermal interface by filling microscopic air-gaps present due to the imperfectly flat and smooth surfaces of the components; the compound has far greater thermal conductivity than air (but far less than metal). In electronics, it is often used to aid a component's thermal dissipation via a heat sink.

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